Immigration Voice - Forums - Legacy
Register Get Involved Contact Lawmakers Advocacy Discussion Image Image Image Image

Go Back   Immigration Voice > General Information > Interesting Topics
Click to log in with Facebook
Interesting Topics This forum is to discuss any topic of interest to members and to gossip about anything that members prefer. All the terms of the forum and terms of use of the website do apply to this forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #301  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:01 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default IS it four of five....Not sure...who cares?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
Sap Services:
Business Process Outsourcing

To become leaner and more efficient, companies often review their value propositions and restructure their operations. An increasing number of organizations are also choosing to outsource their peripheral activities – selecting business process outsourcing (BPO).

By working with external providers, you can also realize cost-cutting alternatives to internally implementing such non-core business processes as human resources and procurement. As a result, your organization can focus on developing its core competencies and better allocate and leverage the resources that drive growth and innovation.

SAP-Enabled BPO Services

SAP is not a BPO provider. Instead, it supports BPO providers by setting up services that can generate sustainable business benefits – reduced costs, fewer risks, and improved process quality.

Using delivery platforms based on SAP solutions, BPO providers can differentiate their services from traditional BPO offerings. These platforms are based on the latest versions of SAP applications and deployed to provide cost-effective and standards-compliant solutions. In selecting our dedicated services of solution design, delivery, and management support, you can gain up-to-date support and state-of-the-art performance that complement your core business function.

As a global solution provider for shared-service centers, SAP can also support many BPO segments. Our customers benefit from implementing such BPO-aligned applications as SAP ERP HCM and SAP SRM as well as industry-specific processes.



BPO Powered by the Market Leader

SAP powers dozens of large, complex BPO operations worldwide through the services of our select BPO providers.


BPO Providers Powered by SAP

By working closely with our providers, and providing them with our BPO certification and other services like SAP Enterprise Support and SAP Safeguarding, SAP can help our providers maintain a high level of technical expertise in SAP solutions and proven support capabilities. Learn More.


Business Benefits

How does SAP technology – and its BPO-specific deployment – provide better BPO? Through lower costs, better risk management, and improved process quality. Learn More.




BPO EXCELLENCE

Discover how SAP enables clients and providers to achieve excellence through BPO. Log-in required.

Emphasis

View the Webcasts.




HR OUTSOURCING: EquaTerra

SAP and EquaTerra discuss the benefits of HRO 2.0, a new approach to human resources outsourcing. Log-in required.

Emphasis

Play the audio.




FINDING AND KEEPING THE BEST TALENT

Discover how companies find, develop and retain the most talented individuals.

EmphasisLearn More.




DRIVING DOWN BPO COSTS

Learn how technology can drive down your short- and long-term BPO costs. Log-in required.

Literature


Read the report (PDF).




REDUCING RISKS, INCREASING VALUE

With SAP BPO solutions, you can reduce costs, mitigate risks, and realize business value.

LiteratureRead this brief (PDF).



Want to learn more? Contact SAP for more information
HELLO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #302  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:02 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default OK, out now!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
Go-to-Market Initiative: Oracle Business Process Outsourcing

Oracle Business Process Outsourcing
Oracle Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) is a sell-through partner initiative that makes the complete Oracle stack of world-leading applications, database, and middleware products available to service providers. Only BPO providers leveraging Oracle technology can offer BPO Powered by Oracle. As a BPO provider, your time-to-deployment is inextricably linked to your IT platform of choice. Oracle's best-in-class applications and technology ensures that you will be able to get your customers up and running faster–and that you are able to upgrade them seamlessly to new releases. Moreover, Oracle's industry leadership and market penetration in Human Capital Management, Supply Chain Management, and Customer Relationship Management offer you opportunities to expand your portfolio of service offerings when the time is right.

About the Oracle Business Process Outsourcing Go-to-Market Initiative

Oracle PartnerNetwork's Oracle BPO Go-to-Market Initiative enables service providers to engage Oracle and its customers with offerings that complement Oracle BPO in selected product, market, and solution channel activities. This Initiative consists of a comprehensive set of programs and services to help partners develop and promote their solutions in conjunction with Oracle.

Check out the requirements section below for details on joining the Oracle BPO Go-to-Market Initiative.
Not yet a member in Oracle PartnerNetwork? You will also find information below about the benefits of joining the Oracle PartnerNetwork.

Why Partner with Oracle?
Build Your Business With OPN (PDF)
Join Oracle PartnerNetwork
Hello!!!
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #303  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:03 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Well, let see if this works!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
Business process outsourcing (BPO) is a form of outsourcing which involves the contracting of the operations and responsibilities of a specific business function to a third-party service provider.

Traditionally, BPO is undertaken by manufacturing firms, for instance Coca Cola, where almost the entire supply chain is outsourced and the company is essentially becoming a marketing organization.[1] More recently, it is also used by service oriented businesses, such as the Bank of America, who outsourced their entire Human Resources function to the BPO firm Exult Inc.[2]

BPO is often divided into two categories: back office outsourcing, which includes internal business functions such as billing or purchasing, and front office outsourcing, which includes customer-related services such as marketing or tech support. BPO that is contracted outside a company's own country is sometimes called offshore outsourcing. BPO that is contracted to a company's neighboring country is sometimes called nearshore outsourcing.

Use of a BPO as opposed to an application service provider (ASP) usually also means that a certain amount of risk is transferred to the company that is running the process elements on behalf of the outsourcer. BPO includes the software, the process management, and the people to operate the service, while a typical ASP model includes only the provision of access to functionalities and features provided or 'served up' through the use of software, usually via web browser to the customer.

BPO is a part of the outsourcing industry. It is dependent on information technology, hence it is also referred to as information technology enabled services or ITES. Knowledge process outsourcing and legal process outsourcing are some of the subsets of business process outsourcing.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Industry size
* 2 BPO increasing the flexibility of organizations
* 3 Threats
* 4 References
* 5 See also
* 6 External links

[edit] Industry size

India has revenues of 10.9 billion USD[3] from offshore BPO and 30 billion USD from IT and total BPO (expected in FY 2008). India thus has some 5-6% share of the total BPO Industry, but a commanding 63% share of the offshore component. This 63% is a drop from the 70% offshore share that India enjoyed last year, despite the industry growing 38% in India last year, other locations like Eastern Europe, Philippines, Morocco, Egypt and South Africa have emerged to take a share of the market. China is also trying to grow from a very small base in this industry. However, while the BPO industry is expected to continue to grow in India, its market share of the offshore piece is expected to decline. The Important centers in India are Bangalore, Hyderabad, Mumbai, Chennai and New Delhi.

The top five Indian BPO exporters for 2006-2007 according to NASSCOM are Genpact, WNS Global Services, Transworks Information Services, IBM Daksh, and TCS BPO.[4]

According to McKinsey, the global "addressable" BPO market is worth $122 - $154 billion, of which: 35-40 retail banking, 25-35 insurance, 10-12 travel/hospitality, 10-12 auto, 8-10 telecoms, 8 pharma, 10-15 others and 20-25 is finance, accounting and HR. Moreover, they estimate that 8% of that capacity was utilized as of 2006.

[edit] BPO increasing the flexibility of organizations

One of the most important advantages of BPO is the way in which it helps to increase a company’s flexibility. However, several sources have different ways in which they perceive organizational flexibility. Therefore business process outsourcing enhances the flexibility of an organization in different ways.

Most services provided by BPO vendors are offered on a fee-for-service basis. This helps a company becoming more flexible by transforming fixed into variable costs.[5] A variable cost structure helps a company responding to changes in required capacity and does not requisite a company in investing in assets and hereby making the company more flexible.[6] Outsourcing may provide a firm with increased flexibility in its resource management and reduce response times to major environmental changes.

Another way in which BPO contributes to a company’s flexibility is that a company is able to focus on its core competencies, without being burdened by the demands of bureaucratic dictate.[7] Key employees are herewith released from performing non-core or administrative processes and can invest more time and energy in building the firm’s core businesses.[8] The key in this lies in knowing, which of the main value drivers to focus on – customer intimacy, product leadership, or operational excellence. Focusing on one of these drivers may help a company create a competitive edge.[9]

A third way in which BPO increases organizational flexibility is by increasing the speed of business processes. Using techniques such as linear programming is a way to reduce cycle time and inventory levels, which reduces a company’s slack. Supply chain management with the effective use of supply chain partners and business process outsourcing increases the speed of several business processes, such as the throughput in the case of a manufacturing company.[10]

Finally, flexibility is seen as a stage in the organizational life cycle. BPO helped to transform Nortel from a bureaucratic organization into a very agile organization. A company can hereby help maintaining ambitious growth goals, which do not fit with regular incumbent strategies.[11] BPO therefore allows firms to retain their entrepreneurial speed and agility, which they would otherwise sacrifice in order to become efficient as they greatly expanded. It avoids a premature internal transition from its informal entrepreneurial phase to a more bureaucratic mode of operation.[12]

Although the above-mentioned arguments favor the view that BPO increases the flexibility of organizations, management needs to be careful with the implementation of it. Some tends to change their attitudes, personalities and character on how the way they talk to other clients. Although BPO has many potential advantages there are a few stumbling blocks, which could counter these advantages. Among problems, which arise in practice are: A failure to meet service levels, unclear contractual issues, changing requirements and unforeseen charges. When BPO does not work out as planned the company might well experience the way in which BPO makes a company very dependent on a vendor and therefore very inflexible. Consequently, these challenges need to be considered before a company decides to engage in business process outsourcing[13]

[edit] Threats

Risk is the major drawback with Business Process Outsourcing. Outsourcing of an Information System, for example, can cause security risks both from a communication and from a privacy perspective. From a knowledge perspective, a changing attitude in employees, underestimation of running costs and the major risk of losing independence, outsourcing leads to a different relationship between an organization and its contractor.[14][15]

Risks and threats of outsourcing must therefore be managed, to achieve any benefits. In order to manage outsourcing in a structured way, maximizing positive outcome, and minimizing risks and avoiding any threats, a Business Continuity Management (BCM) model is setup. BCM consists of a set of steps, to successfully identify, manage and control that business processes that are, or can be outsourced.[16]
Another framework, more focused on the identification process of potential outsourceable Information Systems, identified as AHP, is explained.[17]
L. Willcocks, M. Lacity and G. Fitzgerald identify several contracting problems companies face, ranging from unclear contract formatting, to a lack of understanding of technical IT- processes.[18]

[edit] References

1. ^ Tas, J. & Sunder, S. 2004, Financial Services Business Process Outscourcing, Communications of the ACM, Vol 47, No. 5
2. ^ Harmon, P. 2003, An Overview of Business Process Outsourcing, Business Process Trends Newsletter, Vol. 1, No. 9
3. ^ Cover Story
4. ^ NASSCOM Announces Top-15 ITES-BPO Exporters Rankings for FY 06-07
5. ^ Willcocks, L., Hindle, J., Feeny, D. & Lacity, M. 2004, IT and Business Process Outsourcing: The Knowledge Potential, Information Systems Management, Vol. 21, pp 7–15
6. ^ Gilley, K.M., Rasheed, A. 2000. Making More by Doing Less: An Analysis of Outsourcing and its Effects on Firm Performance. Journal of Management, 26 (4): 763-790.
7. ^ Kakabadse, A., Kakabadse. N. 2002. Trends in Outsourcing: Contrasting USA and Europe. European Management Journal Vol. 20, No. 2: 189–198
8. ^ Weerakkody, Vishanth, Currie, L. Wendy and Ekanayake, Yamaya. 2003. Re-engineering business processes through application service providers - challenges, issues and complexities. Business Process Management Journal Vol. 9 No. 6: 776-794
9. ^ Leavy, B. 2004. Outsourcing strategies: opportunities and risk. Strategy and Leadership, 32 (6) : 20-25.
10. ^ Tas, Jeroen, Sunder, Shyam. 2004. Financial Services Business Process Outsourcing. COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM Vol. 47, No. 5
11. ^ Fischer, L.M. 2001. From vertical to Virtual; How Nortel’s Supplier Alliances Extend the enterprise [online]. Strategy+Business, Available from http://www.strategy-business.com/press/16635507/11153 [Accessed 5 February 2008]
12. ^ (Leavy 2004, 20-25)
13. ^ Michel, Vaughan, Fitzgerald, Guy. 1997. The IT outsourcing market place: vendors and their selection. Journal of Information Technology 12: 223-237
Again, you?
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #304  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:04 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes, WE CAN!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
Summary
Symptom

When processing the input on a dynpro, the work process terminates. The relevant C stack (for example, from the trace file of the work process) shows that the error must be in the function dypcnviXt or dynpifld2.
In particular, the error occurs in Unicode systems on platforms with RISC processors.
Other terms

Dynpro, input conversion

Screen SAPLBBP_SC_UI_ITS 0100 field GV_F4_ITMSEL_EVENT
Reason and Prerequisites

You can use dynpro trace level 3 to determine the dynpro field that causes the termination. A more detailed analysis will show that the field on the dynpro is defined with a character-like data type (for example, CHAR), while the same field in the program is declared with a byte-like data type (for example, ABAP type P).
In this case, an error in the SAP kernel takes effect. The system assumes that fields that are defined as character-like on the dynpro are also character-like in the program. In Unicode systems, character-like data types require an alignment, but byte-like data types do not. On platforms with RISC processors, this causes a process termination.
Solution

To solve the problem, you must change the dynpro or the program so that the data type of the dynpro corresponds to the data type of the program with regard to whether or not the data type is character-like.
The specified SP Patch Level provides an SAP kernel that causes the system to issue an error message in this case and, therefore, prevents the process from terminating.

With this patch, field conversions of screen fields without ABAP variable reference are noted as errors (screen SAPLBBP_SC_UI_ITS 0100 field GV_F4_ITMSEL_EVENT).

Since several corrections were made for this patch, ensure that the kernel was created on August 1, 2008 at the earliest. Older kernels with the same patch level still contained errors.

Header Data

Release Status: Released for Customer
Released on: 01.09.2008 10:39:32
Master Language: German
Priority: Correction with low priority
Category: Program error
Primary Component: BC-ABA-SC UI services, screen, batch input

Yes, WE CAN!!
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #305  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:04 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes, WE CAN!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
Summary
Symptom

When processing the input on a dynpro, the work process terminates. The relevant C stack (for example, from the trace file of the work process) shows that the error must be in the function dypcnviXt or dynpifld2.
In particular, the error occurs in Unicode systems on platforms with RISC processors.
Other terms

Dynpro, input conversion

Screen SAPLBBP_SC_UI_ITS 0100 field GV_F4_ITMSEL_EVENT
Reason and Prerequisites

You can use dynpro trace level 3 to determine the dynpro field that causes the termination. A more detailed analysis will show that the field on the dynpro is defined with a character-like data type (for example, CHAR), while the same field in the program is declared with a byte-like data type (for example, ABAP type P).
In this case, an error in the SAP kernel takes effect. The system assumes that fields that are defined as character-like on the dynpro are also character-like in the program. In Unicode systems, character-like data types require an alignment, but byte-like data types do not. On platforms with RISC processors, this causes a process termination.
Solution

To solve the problem, you must change the dynpro or the program so that the data type of the dynpro corresponds to the data type of the program with regard to whether or not the data type is character-like.
The specified SP Patch Level provides an SAP kernel that causes the system to issue an error message in this case and, therefore, prevents the process from terminating.

With this patch, field conversions of screen fields without ABAP variable reference are noted as errors (screen SAPLBBP_SC_UI_ITS 0100 field GV_F4_ITMSEL_EVENT).

Since several corrections were made for this patch, ensure that the kernel was created on August 1, 2008 at the earliest. Older kernels with the same patch level still contained errors.

Header Data

Release Status: Released for Customer
Released on: 01.09.2008 10:39:32
Master Language: German
Priority: Correction with low priority
Category: Program error
Primary Component: BC-ABA-SC UI services, screen, batch input


Yes, WE CAN!!
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #306  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:05 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes, WE CAN!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
Summary
Symptom

When processing the input on a dynpro, the work process terminates. The relevant C stack (for example, from the trace file of the work process) shows that the error must be in the function dypcnviXt or dynpifld2.
In particular, the error occurs in Unicode systems on platforms with RISC processors.
Other terms

Dynpro, input conversion

Screen SAPLBBP_SC_UI_ITS 0100 field GV_F4_ITMSEL_EVENT
Reason and Prerequisites

You can use dynpro trace level 3 to determine the dynpro field that causes the termination. A more detailed analysis will show that the field on the dynpro is defined with a character-like data type (for example, CHAR), while the same field in the program is declared with a byte-like data type (for example, ABAP type P).
In this case, an error in the SAP kernel takes effect. The system assumes that fields that are defined as character-like on the dynpro are also character-like in the program. In Unicode systems, character-like data types require an alignment, but byte-like data types do not. On platforms with RISC processors, this causes a process termination.
Solution

To solve the problem, you must change the dynpro or the program so that the data type of the dynpro corresponds to the data type of the program with regard to whether or not the data type is character-like.
The specified SP Patch Level provides an SAP kernel that causes the system to issue an error message in this case and, therefore, prevents the process from terminating.

With this patch, field conversions of screen fields without ABAP variable reference are noted as errors (screen SAPLBBP_SC_UI_ITS 0100 field GV_F4_ITMSEL_EVENT).

Since several corrections were made for this patch, ensure that the kernel was created on August 1, 2008 at the earliest. Older kernels with the same patch level still contained errors.

Header Data

Release Status: Released for Customer
Released on: 01.09.2008 10:39:32
Master Language: German
Priority: Correction with low priority
Category: Program error
Primary Component: BC-ABA-SC UI services, screen, batch input
Yes, WE CAN!!
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #307  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:06 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes, We Can!

THEY’RE either hapless pests or the very people capable of overthrowing Windows. Take your pick.
Skip to next paragraph
Add to Portfolio

* Microsoft Corp

Go to your Portfolio »
Enlarge This Image
Hazel Thompson for The New York Times

“It feels pretty clear to me that the open process produces better stuff,” says Mark Shuttleworth, whose team at Canonical is leading the Ubuntu project.

In December, hundreds of these controversial software developers gathered for one week at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. They came from all over the world, sporting many of the usual signs of software mercenaries: jeans, ponytails, unruly facial hair and bloodshot eyes.

But rather than preparing to code for the highest bidder, the developers were coordinating their largely volunteer effort to try to undermine Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, which generated close to $17 billion in sales last year.

All the fuss at the meeting centered on something called Ubuntu and a man named Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic 35-year-old billionaire from South Africa who functions as the spiritual and financial leader of this coding clan.

Created just over four years ago, Ubuntu (pronounced oo-BOON-too) has emerged as the fastest-growing and most celebrated version of the Linux operating system, which competes with Windows primarily through its low, low price: $0.

More than 10 million people are estimated to run Ubuntu today, and they represent a threat to Microsoft’s hegemony in developed countries and perhaps even more so in those regions catching up to the technology revolution.

“If we’re successful, we would fundamentally change the operating system market,” Mr. Shuttleworth said during a break at the gathering, the Ubuntu Developer Summit. “Microsoft would need to adapt, and I don’t think that would be unhealthy.”

Linux is free, but there is still money to be made for businesses flanking the operating system. Companies like I.B.M., Hewlett-Packard and Dell place Linux on more than 10 percent of the computers they sell as servers, and businesses pay the hardware makers and others, like the software sellers Red Hat and Oracle, to fix any problems and keep their Linux-based systems up to date.

But Canonical, Mr. Shuttleworth’s company that makes Ubuntu, has decided to focus its near-term aspirations on the PCs used by workers and people at home.

The notion of a strong Linux-based competitor to Windows and, to a lesser extent, Apple’s Mac OS X has been an enduring dream of advocates of open-source software. They champion the idea that software that can be freely altered by the masses can prove cheaper and better than proprietary code produced by stodgy corporations. Try as they might, however, Linux zealots have failed in their quest to make Linux mainstream on desktop and notebook computers. The often quirky software remains in the realm of geeks, not grandmothers.

With Ubuntu, the devotees believe, things might finally be different.

“I think Ubuntu has captured people’s imaginations around the Linux desktop,” said Chris DiBona, the program manager for open-source software at Google. “If there is a hope for the Linux desktop, it would be them.”

Close to half of Google’s 20,000 employees use a slightly modified version of Ubuntu, playfully called Goobuntu.

PEOPLE encountering Ubuntu for the first time will find it very similar to Windows. The operating system has a slick graphical interface, familiar menus and all the common desktop software: a Web browser, an e-mail program, instant-messaging software and a free suite of programs for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

While relatively easy to use for the technologically savvy, Ubuntu — and all other versions of Linux — can challenge the average user. Linux cannot run many applications created for Windows, including some of the most popular games and tax software, for example. And updates to Linux can send ripples of problems through the system, causing something as basic as a computer’s display or sound system to malfunction.

Canonical has tried to smooth out many of the issues that have prevented Linux from reaching the mainstream. This attention to detail with a desktop version of Linux contrasts with the focus of the largest sellers of the operating system, Red Hat and Novell. While these companies make desktop versions, they have spent most of their time chasing the big money in data centers. As a result, Ubuntu emerged as a sort of favored nation for those idealistic software developers who viewed themselves as part of a countercultural movement.

“It is the same thing companies like Apple and Google have done well, which is build not just a community but a passionate community,” said Ian Murdock, who created an earlier version of Linux called Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Mainstream technology companies have taken notice of the enthusiasm around Ubuntu. Dell started to sell PCs and desktops with the software in 2007, and I.B.M. more recently began making Ubuntu the basis of a software package that competes against Windows.
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #308  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:08 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes, We Can!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcisadawg View Post
THEY’RE either hapless pests or the very people capable of overthrowing Windows. Take your pick.
Skip to next paragraph
Add to Portfolio

* Microsoft Corp

Go to your Portfolio »
Enlarge This Image
Hazel Thompson for The New York Times

“It feels pretty clear to me that the open process produces better stuff,” says Mark Shuttleworth, whose team at Canonical is leading the Ubuntu project.

In December, hundreds of these controversial software developers gathered for one week at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. They came from all over the world, sporting many of the usual signs of software mercenaries: jeans, ponytails, unruly facial hair and bloodshot eyes.

But rather than preparing to code for the highest bidder, the developers were coordinating their largely volunteer effort to try to undermine Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, which generated close to $17 billion in sales last year.

All the fuss at the meeting centered on something called Ubuntu and a man named Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic 35-year-old billionaire from South Africa who functions as the spiritual and financial leader of this coding clan.

Created just over four years ago, Ubuntu (pronounced oo-BOON-too) has emerged as the fastest-growing and most celebrated version of the Linux operating system, which competes with Windows primarily through its low, low price: $0.

More than 10 million people are estimated to run Ubuntu today, and they represent a threat to Microsoft’s hegemony in developed countries and perhaps even more so in those regions catching up to the technology revolution.

“If we’re successful, we would fundamentally change the operating system market,” Mr. Shuttleworth said during a break at the gathering, the Ubuntu Developer Summit. “Microsoft would need to adapt, and I don’t think that would be unhealthy.”

Linux is free, but there is still money to be made for businesses flanking the operating system. Companies like I.B.M., Hewlett-Packard and Dell place Linux on more than 10 percent of the computers they sell as servers, and businesses pay the hardware makers and others, like the software sellers Red Hat and Oracle, to fix any problems and keep their Linux-based systems up to date.

But Canonical, Mr. Shuttleworth’s company that makes Ubuntu, has decided to focus its near-term aspirations on the PCs used by workers and people at home.

The notion of a strong Linux-based competitor to Windows and, to a lesser extent, Apple’s Mac OS X has been an enduring dream of advocates of open-source software. They champion the idea that software that can be freely altered by the masses can prove cheaper and better than proprietary code produced by stodgy corporations. Try as they might, however, Linux zealots have failed in their quest to make Linux mainstream on desktop and notebook computers. The often quirky software remains in the realm of geeks, not grandmothers.

With Ubuntu, the devotees believe, things might finally be different.

“I think Ubuntu has captured people’s imaginations around the Linux desktop,” said Chris DiBona, the program manager for open-source software at Google. “If there is a hope for the Linux desktop, it would be them.”

Close to half of Google’s 20,000 employees use a slightly modified version of Ubuntu, playfully called Goobuntu.

PEOPLE encountering Ubuntu for the first time will find it very similar to Windows. The operating system has a slick graphical interface, familiar menus and all the common desktop software: a Web browser, an e-mail program, instant-messaging software and a free suite of programs for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

While relatively easy to use for the technologically savvy, Ubuntu — and all other versions of Linux — can challenge the average user. Linux cannot run many applications created for Windows, including some of the most popular games and tax software, for example. And updates to Linux can send ripples of problems through the system, causing something as basic as a computer’s display or sound system to malfunction.

Canonical has tried to smooth out many of the issues that have prevented Linux from reaching the mainstream. This attention to detail with a desktop version of Linux contrasts with the focus of the largest sellers of the operating system, Red Hat and Novell. While these companies make desktop versions, they have spent most of their time chasing the big money in data centers. As a result, Ubuntu emerged as a sort of favored nation for those idealistic software developers who viewed themselves as part of a countercultural movement.

“It is the same thing companies like Apple and Google have done well, which is build not just a community but a passionate community,” said Ian Murdock, who created an earlier version of Linux called Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Mainstream technology companies have taken notice of the enthusiasm around Ubuntu. Dell started to sell PCs and desktops with the software in 2007, and I.B.M. more recently began making Ubuntu the basis of a software package that competes against Windows.
Yes, WE CAN
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #309  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:09 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes We Can!!!

HELLO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
THEY’RE either hapless pests or the very people capable of overthrowing Windows. Take your pick.
Skip to next paragraph
Add to Portfolio

* Microsoft Corp

Go to your Portfolio »
Enlarge This Image
Hazel Thompson for The New York Times

“It feels pretty clear to me that the open process produces better stuff,” says Mark Shuttleworth, whose team at Canonical is leading the Ubuntu project.

In December, hundreds of these controversial software developers gathered for one week at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. They came from all over the world, sporting many of the usual signs of software mercenaries: jeans, ponytails, unruly facial hair and bloodshot eyes.

But rather than preparing to code for the highest bidder, the developers were coordinating their largely volunteer effort to try to undermine Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, which generated close to $17 billion in sales last year.

All the fuss at the meeting centered on something called Ubuntu and a man named Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic 35-year-old billionaire from South Africa who functions as the spiritual and financial leader of this coding clan.

Created just over four years ago, Ubuntu (pronounced oo-BOON-too) has emerged as the fastest-growing and most celebrated version of the Linux operating system, which competes with Windows primarily through its low, low price: $0.

More than 10 million people are estimated to run Ubuntu today, and they represent a threat to Microsoft’s hegemony in developed countries and perhaps even more so in those regions catching up to the technology revolution.

“If we’re successful, we would fundamentally change the operating system market,” Mr. Shuttleworth said during a break at the gathering, the Ubuntu Developer Summit. “Microsoft would need to adapt, and I don’t think that would be unhealthy.”

Linux is free, but there is still money to be made for businesses flanking the operating system. Companies like I.B.M., Hewlett-Packard and Dell place Linux on more than 10 percent of the computers they sell as servers, and businesses pay the hardware makers and others, like the software sellers Red Hat and Oracle, to fix any problems and keep their Linux-based systems up to date.

But Canonical, Mr. Shuttleworth’s company that makes Ubuntu, has decided to focus its near-term aspirations on the PCs used by workers and people at home.

The notion of a strong Linux-based competitor to Windows and, to a lesser extent, Apple’s Mac OS X has been an enduring dream of advocates of open-source software. They champion the idea that software that can be freely altered by the masses can prove cheaper and better than proprietary code produced by stodgy corporations. Try as they might, however, Linux zealots have failed in their quest to make Linux mainstream on desktop and notebook computers. The often quirky software remains in the realm of geeks, not grandmothers.

With Ubuntu, the devotees believe, things might finally be different.

“I think Ubuntu has captured people’s imaginations around the Linux desktop,” said Chris DiBona, the program manager for open-source software at Google. “If there is a hope for the Linux desktop, it would be them.”

Close to half of Google’s 20,000 employees use a slightly modified version of Ubuntu, playfully called Goobuntu.

PEOPLE encountering Ubuntu for the first time will find it very similar to Windows. The operating system has a slick graphical interface, familiar menus and all the common desktop software: a Web browser, an e-mail program, instant-messaging software and a free suite of programs for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

While relatively easy to use for the technologically savvy, Ubuntu — and all other versions of Linux — can challenge the average user. Linux cannot run many applications created for Windows, including some of the most popular games and tax software, for example. And updates to Linux can send ripples of problems through the system, causing something as basic as a computer’s display or sound system to malfunction.

Canonical has tried to smooth out many of the issues that have prevented Linux from reaching the mainstream. This attention to detail with a desktop version of Linux contrasts with the focus of the largest sellers of the operating system, Red Hat and Novell. While these companies make desktop versions, they have spent most of their time chasing the big money in data centers. As a result, Ubuntu emerged as a sort of favored nation for those idealistic software developers who viewed themselves as part of a countercultural movement.

“It is the same thing companies like Apple and Google have done well, which is build not just a community but a passionate community,” said Ian Murdock, who created an earlier version of Linux called Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Mainstream technology companies have taken notice of the enthusiasm around Ubuntu. Dell started to sell PCs and desktops with the software in 2007, and I.B.M. more recently began making Ubuntu the basis of a software package that competes against Windows.
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #310  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:10 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default OUT in THREE!

OUT in THREE!
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #311  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:11 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default OUT in TWO!!

HELLO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
THEY’RE either hapless pests or the very people capable of overthrowing Windows. Take your pick.
Skip to next paragraph
Add to Portfolio

* Microsoft Corp

Go to your Portfolio »
Enlarge This Image
Hazel Thompson for The New York Times

“It feels pretty clear to me that the open process produces better stuff,” says Mark Shuttleworth, whose team at Canonical is leading the Ubuntu project.

In December, hundreds of these controversial software developers gathered for one week at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. They came from all over the world, sporting many of the usual signs of software mercenaries: jeans, ponytails, unruly facial hair and bloodshot eyes.

But rather than preparing to code for the highest bidder, the developers were coordinating their largely volunteer effort to try to undermine Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, which generated close to $17 billion in sales last year.

All the fuss at the meeting centered on something called Ubuntu and a man named Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic 35-year-old billionaire from South Africa who functions as the spiritual and financial leader of this coding clan.

Created just over four years ago, Ubuntu (pronounced oo-BOON-too) has emerged as the fastest-growing and most celebrated version of the Linux operating system, which competes with Windows primarily through its low, low price: $0.

More than 10 million people are estimated to run Ubuntu today, and they represent a threat to Microsoft’s hegemony in developed countries and perhaps even more so in those regions catching up to the technology revolution.

“If we’re successful, we would fundamentally change the operating system market,” Mr. Shuttleworth said during a break at the gathering, the Ubuntu Developer Summit. “Microsoft would need to adapt, and I don’t think that would be unhealthy.”

Linux is free, but there is still money to be made for businesses flanking the operating system. Companies like I.B.M., Hewlett-Packard and Dell place Linux on more than 10 percent of the computers they sell as servers, and businesses pay the hardware makers and others, like the software sellers Red Hat and Oracle, to fix any problems and keep their Linux-based systems up to date.

But Canonical, Mr. Shuttleworth’s company that makes Ubuntu, has decided to focus its near-term aspirations on the PCs used by workers and people at home.

The notion of a strong Linux-based competitor to Windows and, to a lesser extent, Apple’s Mac OS X has been an enduring dream of advocates of open-source software. They champion the idea that software that can be freely altered by the masses can prove cheaper and better than proprietary code produced by stodgy corporations. Try as they might, however, Linux zealots have failed in their quest to make Linux mainstream on desktop and notebook computers. The often quirky software remains in the realm of geeks, not grandmothers.

With Ubuntu, the devotees believe, things might finally be different.

“I think Ubuntu has captured people’s imaginations around the Linux desktop,” said Chris DiBona, the program manager for open-source software at Google. “If there is a hope for the Linux desktop, it would be them.”

Close to half of Google’s 20,000 employees use a slightly modified version of Ubuntu, playfully called Goobuntu.

PEOPLE encountering Ubuntu for the first time will find it very similar to Windows. The operating system has a slick graphical interface, familiar menus and all the common desktop software: a Web browser, an e-mail program, instant-messaging software and a free suite of programs for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

While relatively easy to use for the technologically savvy, Ubuntu — and all other versions of Linux — can challenge the average user. Linux cannot run many applications created for Windows, including some of the most popular games and tax software, for example. And updates to Linux can send ripples of problems through the system, causing something as basic as a computer’s display or sound system to malfunction.

Canonical has tried to smooth out many of the issues that have prevented Linux from reaching the mainstream. This attention to detail with a desktop version of Linux contrasts with the focus of the largest sellers of the operating system, Red Hat and Novell. While these companies make desktop versions, they have spent most of their time chasing the big money in data centers. As a result, Ubuntu emerged as a sort of favored nation for those idealistic software developers who viewed themselves as part of a countercultural movement.

“It is the same thing companies like Apple and Google have done well, which is build not just a community but a passionate community,” said Ian Murdock, who created an earlier version of Linux called Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Mainstream technology companies have taken notice of the enthusiasm around Ubuntu. Dell started to sell PCs and desktops with the software in 2007, and I.B.M. more recently began making Ubuntu the basis of a software package that competes against Windows.
__________________
Contributed $100 to 2007 DC Rally.
Contributed $100 to 2009 DC Rally and committed to attend 2009 rally in March.
Sent mails/faxes/cards to Senators, Congresswoman Joe Lofgren, Mr.Chertoff, Mr.Gonzales etc
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #312  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:12 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Out In One!!

HELLO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
THEY’RE either hapless pests or the very people capable of overthrowing Windows. Take your pick.
Skip to next paragraph
Add to Portfolio

* Microsoft Corp

Go to your Portfolio »
Enlarge This Image
Hazel Thompson for The New York Times

“It feels pretty clear to me that the open process produces better stuff,” says Mark Shuttleworth, whose team at Canonical is leading the Ubuntu project.

In December, hundreds of these controversial software developers gathered for one week at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. They came from all over the world, sporting many of the usual signs of software mercenaries: jeans, ponytails, unruly facial hair and bloodshot eyes.

But rather than preparing to code for the highest bidder, the developers were coordinating their largely volunteer effort to try to undermine Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, which generated close to $17 billion in sales last year.

All the fuss at the meeting centered on something called Ubuntu and a man named Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic 35-year-old billionaire from South Africa who functions as the spiritual and financial leader of this coding clan.

Created just over four years ago, Ubuntu (pronounced oo-BOON-too) has emerged as the fastest-growing and most celebrated version of the Linux operating system, which competes with Windows primarily through its low, low price: $0.

More than 10 million people are estimated to run Ubuntu today, and they represent a threat to Microsoft’s hegemony in developed countries and perhaps even more so in those regions catching up to the technology revolution.

“If we’re successful, we would fundamentally change the operating system market,” Mr. Shuttleworth said during a break at the gathering, the Ubuntu Developer Summit. “Microsoft would need to adapt, and I don’t think that would be unhealthy.”

Linux is free, but there is still money to be made for businesses flanking the operating system. Companies like I.B.M., Hewlett-Packard and Dell place Linux on more than 10 percent of the computers they sell as servers, and businesses pay the hardware makers and others, like the software sellers Red Hat and Oracle, to fix any problems and keep their Linux-based systems up to date.

But Canonical, Mr. Shuttleworth’s company that makes Ubuntu, has decided to focus its near-term aspirations on the PCs used by workers and people at home.

The notion of a strong Linux-based competitor to Windows and, to a lesser extent, Apple’s Mac OS X has been an enduring dream of advocates of open-source software. They champion the idea that software that can be freely altered by the masses can prove cheaper and better than proprietary code produced by stodgy corporations. Try as they might, however, Linux zealots have failed in their quest to make Linux mainstream on desktop and notebook computers. The often quirky software remains in the realm of geeks, not grandmothers.

With Ubuntu, the devotees believe, things might finally be different.

“I think Ubuntu has captured people’s imaginations around the Linux desktop,” said Chris DiBona, the program manager for open-source software at Google. “If there is a hope for the Linux desktop, it would be them.”

Close to half of Google’s 20,000 employees use a slightly modified version of Ubuntu, playfully called Goobuntu.

PEOPLE encountering Ubuntu for the first time will find it very similar to Windows. The operating system has a slick graphical interface, familiar menus and all the common desktop software: a Web browser, an e-mail program, instant-messaging software and a free suite of programs for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

While relatively easy to use for the technologically savvy, Ubuntu — and all other versions of Linux — can challenge the average user. Linux cannot run many applications created for Windows, including some of the most popular games and tax software, for example. And updates to Linux can send ripples of problems through the system, causing something as basic as a computer’s display or sound system to malfunction.

Canonical has tried to smooth out many of the issues that have prevented Linux from reaching the mainstream. This attention to detail with a desktop version of Linux contrasts with the focus of the largest sellers of the operating system, Red Hat and Novell. While these companies make desktop versions, they have spent most of their time chasing the big money in data centers. As a result, Ubuntu emerged as a sort of favored nation for those idealistic software developers who viewed themselves as part of a countercultural movement.

“It is the same thing companies like Apple and Google have done well, which is build not just a community but a passionate community,” said Ian Murdock, who created an earlier version of Linux called Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Mainstream technology companies have taken notice of the enthusiasm around Ubuntu. Dell started to sell PCs and desktops with the software in 2007, and I.B.M. more recently began making Ubuntu the basis of a software package that competes against Windows.
__________________
Contributed $100 to 2007 DC Rally.
Contributed $100 to 2009 DC Rally and committed to attend 2009 rally in March.
Sent mails/faxes/cards to Senators, Congresswoman Joe Lofgren, Mr.Chertoff, Mr.Gonzales etc
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #313  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:13 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Gone

GONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
THEY’RE either hapless pests or the very people capable of overthrowing Windows. Take your pick.
Skip to next paragraph
Add to Portfolio

* Microsoft Corp

Go to your Portfolio »
Enlarge This Image
Hazel Thompson for The New York Times

“It feels pretty clear to me that the open process produces better stuff,” says Mark Shuttleworth, whose team at Canonical is leading the Ubuntu project.

In December, hundreds of these controversial software developers gathered for one week at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. They came from all over the world, sporting many of the usual signs of software mercenaries: jeans, ponytails, unruly facial hair and bloodshot eyes.

But rather than preparing to code for the highest bidder, the developers were coordinating their largely volunteer effort to try to undermine Microsoft’s Windows operating system for PCs, which generated close to $17 billion in sales last year.

All the fuss at the meeting centered on something called Ubuntu and a man named Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic 35-year-old billionaire from South Africa who functions as the spiritual and financial leader of this coding clan.

Created just over four years ago, Ubuntu (pronounced oo-BOON-too) has emerged as the fastest-growing and most celebrated version of the Linux operating system, which competes with Windows primarily through its low, low price: $0.

More than 10 million people are estimated to run Ubuntu today, and they represent a threat to Microsoft’s hegemony in developed countries and perhaps even more so in those regions catching up to the technology revolution.

“If we’re successful, we would fundamentally change the operating system market,” Mr. Shuttleworth said during a break at the gathering, the Ubuntu Developer Summit. “Microsoft would need to adapt, and I don’t think that would be unhealthy.”

Linux is free, but there is still money to be made for businesses flanking the operating system. Companies like I.B.M., Hewlett-Packard and Dell place Linux on more than 10 percent of the computers they sell as servers, and businesses pay the hardware makers and others, like the software sellers Red Hat and Oracle, to fix any problems and keep their Linux-based systems up to date.

But Canonical, Mr. Shuttleworth’s company that makes Ubuntu, has decided to focus its near-term aspirations on the PCs used by workers and people at home.

The notion of a strong Linux-based competitor to Windows and, to a lesser extent, Apple’s Mac OS X has been an enduring dream of advocates of open-source software. They champion the idea that software that can be freely altered by the masses can prove cheaper and better than proprietary code produced by stodgy corporations. Try as they might, however, Linux zealots have failed in their quest to make Linux mainstream on desktop and notebook computers. The often quirky software remains in the realm of geeks, not grandmothers.

With Ubuntu, the devotees believe, things might finally be different.

“I think Ubuntu has captured people’s imaginations around the Linux desktop,” said Chris DiBona, the program manager for open-source software at Google. “If there is a hope for the Linux desktop, it would be them.”

Close to half of Google’s 20,000 employees use a slightly modified version of Ubuntu, playfully called Goobuntu.

PEOPLE encountering Ubuntu for the first time will find it very similar to Windows. The operating system has a slick graphical interface, familiar menus and all the common desktop software: a Web browser, an e-mail program, instant-messaging software and a free suite of programs for creating documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

While relatively easy to use for the technologically savvy, Ubuntu — and all other versions of Linux — can challenge the average user. Linux cannot run many applications created for Windows, including some of the most popular games and tax software, for example. And updates to Linux can send ripples of problems through the system, causing something as basic as a computer’s display or sound system to malfunction.

Canonical has tried to smooth out many of the issues that have prevented Linux from reaching the mainstream. This attention to detail with a desktop version of Linux contrasts with the focus of the largest sellers of the operating system, Red Hat and Novell. While these companies make desktop versions, they have spent most of their time chasing the big money in data centers. As a result, Ubuntu emerged as a sort of favored nation for those idealistic software developers who viewed themselves as part of a countercultural movement.

“It is the same thing companies like Apple and Google have done well, which is build not just a community but a passionate community,” said Ian Murdock, who created an earlier version of Linux called Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Mainstream technology companies have taken notice of the enthusiasm around Ubuntu. Dell started to sell PCs and desktops with the software in 2007, and I.B.M. more recently began making Ubuntu the basis of a software package that competes against Windows.
__________________
Contributed $100 to 2007 DC Rally.
Contributed $100 to 2009 DC Rally and committed to attend 2009 rally in March.
Sent mails/faxes/cards to Senators, Congresswoman Joe Lofgren, Mr.Chertoff, Mr.Gonzales etc
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #314  
Old 01-13-2009, 12:17 PM
gcisadawg gcisadawg is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Oct-03
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Chargeability
:
India
Processing Stage
:
I-485
I485 Mailed Date
:
08/02/2007
Compare
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 443
gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute gcisadawg has a reputation beyond repute
Default Yes We Can

YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
YES WE CAN
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


  #315  
Old 01-13-2009, 02:00 PM
bfadlia bfadlia is offline
Senior Member
Priority Date
:
Jul-05
Category
:
EB3
I140 Mailed Date
:
Chargeability
:
Egypt
Processing Stage
:
I-140
I485 Mailed Date
:
Compare
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of bfadlia has much to be proud of
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boreal View Post
Havent you heard the Iranian president say that there are no gays in his country/religion? :-)
i would agree the guy is in most instances a nut job.. he's rediculed in muslim countries too outside Iran
but on this one several Persian speaking friends told he was mis-translated. He said "we do not have gay PROBLEMS like western countries"
Here in the US you hear there is a big struggle about whether gays should get married, should be taught in school, can adopt kids, .. while in most non-western countries, including India I guess, gays just fly under the radar.
He's was stating the fact there is no gay movement there, not denying gays exist.
Bookmark and Share Compare Reply With Quote


Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0 (Unregistered)
(c)ImmigrationVoice.org