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StuckInTheMuck
04-27-2009, 09:04 PM
With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am putting together a list of things to do, and not do, to maintain our freshly minted PR status, which should also help during future citizenship application. The list is mostly about little things that others have learned from experience (and I am learning from their experience, by reading in immigration-related forums such as IV). The more obvious things that can be found for example in USCIS handbook (http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-618.pdf) are not included here. Below is a snapshot of what I have gleaned from Internet so far, and please add your own input(s):

LIST of DO's :

1. Carry the original PR card on your person at all times (e.g. in your wallet), keep photocopies in different places, and also store A# on your computers. Note: This is a contentious issue (do a google on "carry green card" and see for yourself), despite being required by law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Some people are naturally worried about losing wallet and the eventual hassle of replacing the lost card (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=b3f7ab0a43b5d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=db029c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD), whereas others, including me, prefer to follow the law, in case I am suddenly asked to produce evidence of my legal status (e.g. in some border states, or unforeseen events, such as being involved in an out-of-state car accident where showing my DL might just not be enough). Failure to comply may result in, at best a fine, and at worst detention for breaking a law. (See comments by InTheMoment below for additional perspectives.)

2. Retain all original copies of USCIS documents related to your legal status during the entire period of stay in USA, and shred all photocopies (except when you have a photocopy but not its original).

3. Retain all employment-related documents, particularly original copies of appointment letters.

4. Retain copies of all tax return forms from the year of your first entry, or (at least) previous 10 years (you can request IRS (http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4506.pdf), or your professional tax preparer, for any missing copy).

5. Maintain a detailed log of USA exit/entry, including dates, POE and countries traveled, beginning with the day of first entry.

6. Maintain a detailed list of all legal troubles, including minor traffic infractions such as speeding violations (ignore parking violations, because they do not constitute legal "detention"), going as far back as possible. Keep copies of all relevant court papers, traffic tickets, proof of any payment (e.g. scanned copies of personal checks used, credit card statements), and so on.

7. Update your social security card (http://www.ssa.gov/online/ss-5.html) to remove any restrictive clause about work authorization printed on it. Here is another thread (http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showthread.php?t=20610) that discusses this point further. Note: AFAIK, the procedure changes nothing as far as your privileges go, and some of you may not even have such a clause on your SS card (I don't have it either).

8. Return your I-94 cards to POE on your next trip outside USA, to "close the open files" on your past travels. AFAIK, this may be more relevant to those who applied for GC via special registration (NSEER) (http://www.ice.gov/pi/specialregistration/), and probably does not matter to others.

9. Renew DL to get rid of the annoying "Temporary" word (in case you are in one of those states that do this).

10. Update your status with your employer by filing new I-9 form (thanks to InTheMoment for this point).

11. Continue to notify USCIS (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=c1a94154d7b3d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D) about change of address within 10 days of moving, as before (thanks to seahawks for this point).

12. Keep a list of current and past residential addresses, including dates of stay. Retain all leases/ownership documents.

13. Remember the basics: Initiate your GC/passport renewal process at least 6 months before expiry/Intl travel (Thanks to pappu for this point.)

14. And yes, move the family first commitment at the top of your must-do list, now that you have less worry about re-entry, and make that long-delayed trip home to see your old folks one more time. (I am visiting my 83-yr old Dad, who still has more hair than I do, and less gray too, in June.)

LIST of DONOT's :

1. Do not sign up for voter registration card. In particular, never vote in national/state/local elections that are open only to citizens, because this is also a law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Even an accidental mistake (e.g. voting out of ignorance) is a serious offense, which would not only derail your future citizenship plan, but may even result in deportation.

2. Do not develop a pattern of frequent and/or long absences from USA, unless you have taken prior permission for valid reasons (e.g., studying abroad, medical emergencies etc). Otherwise you may face trouble at POE on your next re-entry attempt, because DHS has become stricter in recent times about possible misuse of PR status, and POE folks are now trained to spot such patterns.

3. Do not switch job soon after getting GC. This is one of the most discussed, but least understood, issues because no one seems to agree on "how soon is soon". The rule of thumb appears to be "6 months", and a safer bet is "1 year" (here is a thread (http://forums.immigration.com/showthread.php?t=154533) on another forum). This again relates to USCIS being increasingly sensitive to possible misuse of PR status, and this question will come up during your citizenship application process. (Invoking AC21 while GC was pending makes the issue somewhat different (http://www.murthy.com/485faq.html#13).)

4. Those of us who self-sponsored our GC via NIW or EB1A route are not bound by such employer-employee commitment, but you should continue working in "similar areas of expertise" that you claimed in your NIW/EB1A petition, and preferably on a longer time scale.

[This is an evolving list thanks to valuable inputs from folks here and elsewhere, so keep checking back.]

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck

pappu
04-27-2009, 09:43 PM
Thanks.
Please also add in IV wiki

vxb2004
04-27-2009, 10:21 PM
Nice compilation!

like_watching_paint_dry
04-27-2009, 11:32 PM
6. Maintain a detailed list of all legal troubles, including minor traffic infractions such as speeding violations (ignore parking violations, because they do not constitute legal "detention"), going as far back as possible. Keep copies of all relevant court papers, traffic tickets, proof of any payment (e.g. scanned copies of personal checks used, credit card statements), and so on.

Why should speeding tickets matter? :confused:
It's been some time but I recall being asked something about legal troubles but lawyers when they filed my 485. They said to exclude speeding tickets.

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 12:02 AM
Why should speeding tickets matter?

(To make sure we are on the same page, I am talking about maintaining PR status after you have GC, and not while your I-485 petition is pending.) Speeding tickets do not matter in maintaining PR status, neither do they matter in your eventual citizenship status, but you must include them in the citizenship application form N-400 (http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/N-400.pdf), Part 10, Question 16: "Have you even been arrested, cited, or detained by any law enforcement officer for any reason?" Speeding tickets mean both citation and temporary detention (this is why parking violations are excluded). However, for such minor infractions you do not need to attach documents wth your application (see the bottom sentence in page 25 here (http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/M-476.pdf)). But it is still a good idea to keep all documentation, no matter how trivial.

gcdreamer05
04-28-2009, 12:06 AM
Thank you stuck in the muck, i will follow these in the year 2019 when i get my green card and hopefully if i am alive !!!!!!!!! :D:eek::rolleyes::mad::(

rb_248
04-28-2009, 12:16 AM
Back in the days there was a campaign launched by Govt of India to plant more trees.....the slogan was "plant one tree for every house". A wise guy was prompt to ask the govt... "give me a house, I will plant a tree". Likewise, give me the GC, I will definitely follow the rules.

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 12:45 AM
give me the GC, I will definitely follow the rules.

Well, yes, in case it is not clear enough, the whole point of this discussion, beginning with the very title "Life after GC", is indeed about following certain rules only after you get GC, and until then you are certainly welcome to ignore them :)

like_watching_paint_dry
04-28-2009, 01:06 AM
Dang! I need to hire a secretary to track all the stuff that N-400 needs :(

InTheMoment
04-28-2009, 01:46 AM
Thanks for the compilation.

Also, in the do_not _register_to_vote point, add: One should not even verbally claim that they are a US Citizen (obviously especially when you are dealing with law enforcement, state and federal agencies). If proven it would essentially strip one of the GC status, make ineligible for naturalization and all set to be in line for deportation.

Secondly, add the point about updating the I-9 if you are employed.

That said, with the AC21 portability, once an employee is working in the sponsor company for more than 180 days after I-485 filing (and possibly years before that) the issue of staying on with the sponsor for 6 months to 1 year is a completely moot point!

Unless I need to show it in travel or elsewhere, I never carry my GC with me at any time, nor will I in the future until I see exceptional enforcement on this. As you mentioned there is a law on this but it letter of law is a bit debatable. There are many competent attorneys (whether correct or not) who have suggested that having it in possession at all times means that you should be able to get it easily. I have my A# in my memory and in a confidential e-mail, that would suffice.

In the event one loses it if carried on person, who would want to get into the trouble of applying for replacement (especially when one has an impending intl. travel). Further I will do everything possible to loose least possible info (incl. A# on the GC) out to the ID theives who get hold of my wallet.

seahawks
04-28-2009, 03:30 AM
don't forget to file change of address AR11 if you move. People tend to forget this since after getting GC there is very little or no paper work required unlike people who are waiting like me:).

a1b2c3
04-28-2009, 05:07 AM
is 2, 3, 4, 5 important for citizenship?

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 08:21 AM
is 2, 3, 4, 5 important for citizenship?
As I said in the preface of the list, the bigger objective here is to take certain steps, including proper documentation (e.g. points 2, 3, 4 and 5), in order to maintain PR status. Besides, you never know what documents you would be asked to produce, given that the citizenship process involves more extensive background checks than the GC process. Also, having a log of exit/entry details (point #5) should help quickly fill out Part 7 of the citizenship form (http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/N-400.pdf).

Added to Wiki here After GC Dos and Donts (http://immigrationvoice.org/wiki/index.php/US_Life_After_GC)
Thanks a bunch, coopheal. As I keep updating the list (based on feedbacks from subsequent posts), is there an easy way to update the Wiki page too?

Never mind, I managed to update it myself.

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 08:23 AM
Dang! I need to hire a secretary to track all the stuff that N-400 needs :(
I can't afford a secretary, which is why I am taking the trouble of knowing the process in advance.

ItIsNotFunny
04-28-2009, 08:27 AM
Nice compilation.

With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am

.....

Okay, this is all I can think of for now. More when I come up with something new.

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 08:29 AM
Thanks InTheMoment and seahawks - your points have been added to the list.

pappu
04-28-2009, 11:09 AM
One more point:

Know when your GC and passport expires so that you can renew it. :)

Getting a GC does not mean you can ignore all your immigration issues.

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 11:39 AM
One more point:

Know when your GC and passport expires so that you can renew it. :)

Getting a GC does not mean you can ignore all your immigration issues.

Abso-lute-ly :) Thanks pappu, your point is added.

gccovet
04-28-2009, 12:32 PM
Stuck(no more)intheMuck,
Nice compilation, thanks for doing this for all of us here.
Just a note( i am not trying to deter anybody or argue against your compilation) that by law all foreigners are required to carry their passport, how many of us follow that, on that note, I will not carry original with me at all. just my 0.02 cents.

Thanks again.

GCCovet

newuser
04-28-2009, 01:01 PM
Thanks for the info.

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 01:28 PM
Just a note( i am not trying to deter anybody or argue against your compilation) that by law all foreigners are required to carry their passport, how many of us follow that, on that note, I will not carry original with me at all. just my 0.02 cents.
GCCovet

True, we do not carry passports every time we step out of our house (for example, when going to pick up Bud Lite from my neighboring grocery store). But I would think that passports, unlike the PR card, are not designed to be tucked into your wallet for carrying around. Also, for PR cards the always-carry-it-on-your-person law is explicitly stated (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD), whereas, stray cases notwithstanding (http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showthread.php?t=16736), I am not aware of a similar law for passports (except maybe when you do not have your usual ID, such as DL).

number30
04-28-2009, 01:43 PM
With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am putting together a list of things to do, and not do, to maintain our freshly minted PR status, which should also help during future citizenship application. The list is mostly about little things that others have learned from experience (and I am learning from their experience, by reading in immigration-related forums such as IV). The more obvious things that can be found for example in USCIS handbook (http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-618.pdf) are not included here. Below is a snapshot of what I have gleaned from Internet so far, and please add your own input(s):

LIST of DO's :

1. Carry the original PR card on your person at all times (e.g. in your wallet), keep photocopies in different places, and also store A# on your computers. Note: This is a contentious issue (do a google on "carry green card" and see for yourself), despite being required by law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Some people are naturally worried about losing wallet and the eventual hassle of replacing the lost card (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=b3f7ab0a43b5d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=db029c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD), whereas others, including me, prefer to follow the law, in case I am suddenly asked to produce evidence of my legal status (e.g. in some border states, or unforeseen events, such as being involved in an out-of-state car accident where showing my DL might just not be enough). Failure to comply may result in, at best a fine, and at worst detention for breaking a law. (See comments by InTheMoment below for additional perspectives.)

2. Retain all original copies of USCIS documents related to your legal status during the entire period of stay in USA, and shred all photocopies (except when you have a photocopy but not its original).

3. Retain all employment-related documents, particularly original copies of appointment letters.

4. Retain copies of all tax return forms from the year of your first entry, or (at least) previous 10 years (you can request IRS (http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4506.pdf), or your professional tax preparer, for any missing copy).

5. Maintain a detailed log of USA exit/entry, including dates, POE and countries traveled, beginning with the day of first entry.

6. Maintain a detailed list of all legal troubles, including minor traffic infractions such as speeding violations (ignore parking violations, because they do not constitute legal "detention"), going as far back as possible. Keep copies of all relevant court papers, traffic tickets, proof of any payment (e.g. scanned copies of personal checks used, credit card statements), and so on.

7. Update your social security card (http://www.ssa.gov/online/ss-5.html) to remove any restrictive clause about work authorization printed on it. Note: AFAIK, the procedure changes nothing as far as your privileges go, and some of you may not even have such a clause on your SS card (I don't have it either).

8. Return your I-94 cards to POE on your next trip outside USA, to "close the open files" on your past travels (I do not know what it means though). Note: AFAIK, this is also not required, and besides, you should have the chance to do this while applying for citizenship.

9. Renew DL to get rid of the annoying "Temporary" word (in case you are in one of those states that do this).

10. Update your status with your employer by filing new I-9 form (thanks to InTheMoment for this point).

11. Continue to inform USCIS (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=c1a94154d7b3d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D) about change of address within 10 days of moving, as before (thanks to seahawks for this point).

12. Keep a list of current and past residential addresses, including dates of stay. Retain all leases/ownership documents.

13. Remember the basics: Initiate your GC/passport renewal process at least 6 months before expiry/Intl travel (Thanks to pappu for this point.)

14. And yes, move the family first commitment at the top of your must-do list, now that you have less worry about re-entry, and make that long-delayed trip home to see your old folks one more time. (I am visiting my 83-yr old Dad, who still has more hair than I do, and less gray too, in June.)

LIST of DONOT's :

1. Do not sign up for voter registration card. In particular, never vote in national/state/local elections that are open only to citizens, because this is also a law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Even an accidental mistake (e.g. voting out of ignorance) is a serious offense, which would not only derail your future citizenship plan, but may even result in deportation.

2. Do not develop a pattern of frequent and/or long absences from USA, unless you have taken prior permission for valid reasons (e.g., studying abroad, medical emergencies etc). Otherwise you may face trouble at POE on your next re-entry attempt, because DHS has become stricter in recent times about possible misuse of PR status, and POE folks are now trained to spot such patterns.

3. Do not switch job soon after getting GC. This is one of the most discussed, but least understood, issues because no one seems to agree on "how soon is soon". The rule of thumb appears to be "6 months", and a safer bet is "1 year" (here is a thread (http://forums.immigration.com/showthread.php?t=154533) on another forum). This again relates to USCIS being increasingly sensitive to possible misuse of PR status, and this question will come up during your citizenship application process. (But, as InTheMoment points out below, the issue becomes moot if you invoke AC21.)

4. Those of us who self-sponsored our GC via NIW or EB1A route are not bound by such employer-employee commitment, but you should continue working in "similar areas of expertise" that you claimed in your NIW/EB1A petition, and preferably on a longer time scale.

Thanks to the folks below whose inputs keep the list growing.

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck


Just One more in DOs.

File AR-11 whenever you move.

StuckInTheMuck
04-28-2009, 01:50 PM
Just One more in DOs.
File AR-11 whenever you move.

Thanks, number30 - someone else beat you for the credit though (point #11) :)

looneytunezez
04-29-2009, 09:03 PM
2. Retain all original copies of USCIS documents related to your legal status during the entire period of stay in USA, and shred all photocopies (except when you have a photocopy but not its original).


Thanks for this info, but I am a million miles away from ever thinking about these.

Just out of curiosity, why "shred" photocopies, except maybe for better document management and not drowning in paper? :D

Is there some ramification towards citizenship?

btw, Congrats on GC. :cool:

LT

a1b2c3
04-29-2009, 09:57 PM
As I said in the preface of the list, the bigger objective here is to take certain steps, including proper documentation (e.g. points 2, 3, 4 and 5), in order to maintain PR status. Besides, you never know what documents you would be asked to produce, given that the citizenship process involves more extensive background checks than the GC process. Also, having a log of exit/entry details (point #5) should help quickly fill out Part 7 of the citizenship form (http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/N-400.pdf).


almost 1735 days away from N400.the form looks very long. is there again a long line for it?

a1b2c3
04-29-2009, 09:59 PM
Thanks for this info, but I am a million miles away from ever thinking about these.

Just out of curiosity, why "shred" photocopies, except maybe for better document management and not drowning in paper? :D

Is there some ramification towards citizenship?

btw, Congrats on GC. :cool:

LT

what do you mean by ramification? you mean advantages? if yes, there are several. that you can be assured of. you can sponsor your parents as fast as you can sponsor your wife. there are many others.

permfiling
04-29-2009, 10:17 PM
Insane list ...I lost 50% of my head hair staying in US since last 10 yrs and now loose the rest doing the book keeping...no wonder stone age was fun ;-)

Thanks for this info, but I am a million miles away from ever thinking about these.

Just out of curiosity, why "shred" photocopies, except maybe for better document management and not drowning in paper? :D

Is there some ramification towards citizenship?

btw, Congrats on GC. :cool:

LT

StuckInTheMuck
04-30-2009, 01:02 AM
Just out of curiosity, why "shred" photocopies, except maybe for better document management and not drowning in paper?
Is there some ramification towards citizenship?
Better documentation is the reason why I got rid of those photocopies (I had crate-loads of them piled up over time). I guess you can just throw this junk in your recycle bin too. But because these are immigration-related papers, and all sorts of shady ID thieves are snooping around these days, I permitted myself a little paranoia and shoved them down my office shredder.

Insane list ...I lost 50% of my head hair staying in US since last 10 yrs and now loose the rest doing the book keeping...no wonder stone age was fun ;-)
Thank your stars - I already lost almost all my hair over the last 10 years of stay here. This is the curse of progress - another million years later, if the human race survives guns and germs, our descendants would likewise wish they were back in our stone age :)

StuckInTheMuck
04-30-2009, 10:05 AM
almost 1735 days away from N400.the form looks very long. is there again a long line for it?
My wait time is as long as yours, so I am not thinking about getting ready for citizenship just yet (lot can happen in 5 years). If the USCIS processing times are to be believed, they are supposed to take between 12 and 15 months to decide on a currently filed application (the server seems to be down now, so couldn't verify the latest status). There may be additional time differences depending on where you are located. And knowing how USCIS operates, backlogs are not unheard of (http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/images/File/factcheck/CitizenshipDayFactSheet09-16-08.pdf).

Here is a comforting thought - and someone correct me if I am wrong - but unlike the hectic GC process with all the "inequalities" among various EB categories, naturalization process is a level-playing field where your specific skills do not matter. Everyone is considered equal here, whether you have got your GC via EB, FB or even amnesty route. This makes sense too, considering that your value (to this country) as a citizen rests primarily in your voting right, and someone who can cook is just as good to vote as another who writes smart computer codes (no knock on the cook, my wife is a fantastic cook herself). This is why the "priority date" for your citizenship application is set at 5 years (of continuous residency) from the date printed on your PR card, irrespective of your GC category (the wait is 3 years for those with USC spouse). The only condition that permits some arbitrariness in the evaluation process is in establishing a "good moral character", which makes point #6 in my original list important.

a1b2c3
04-30-2009, 02:13 PM
My wait time is as long as yours, so I am not thinking about getting ready for citizenship just yet (lot can happen in 5 years). If the USCIS processing times are to be believed, they are supposed to take between 12 and 15 months to decide on a currently filed application (the server seems to be down now, so couldn't verify the latest status). There may be additional time differences depending on where you are located. And knowing how USCIS operates, backlogs are not unheard of (http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/images/File/factcheck/CitizenshipDayFactSheet09-16-08.pdf).

Here is a comforting thought - and someone correct me if I am wrong - but unlike the hectic GC process with all the "inequalities" among various EB categories, naturalization process is a level-playing field where your specific skills do not matter. Everyone is considered equal here, whether you have got your GC via EB, FB or even amnesty route. This makes sense too, considering that your value (to this country) as a citizen rests primarily in your voting right, and someone who can cook is just as good to vote as another who writes smart computer codes (no knock on the cook, my wife is a fantastic cook herself). This is why the "priority date" for your citizenship application is set at 5 years (of continuous residency) from the date printed on your PR card, irrespective of your GC category (the wait is 3 years for those with USC spouse). The only condition that permits some arbitrariness in the evaluation process is in establishing a "good moral character", which makes point #6 in my original list important.

This is of 01/09. It takes about 6 months after N-400 is filed and you can apply after 4 years and 9 months.
http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/M-476.pdf
Yes, there will be backlogs but most likely there won't be long waiting lines. It really depends on the number of people filing. There won't be another July 2007.

StuckInTheMuck
04-30-2009, 02:42 PM
Thanks. I have seen this document before, and if we are both looking at the same place (top of page 10), this is an average estimate that sweeps lot of detail under the carpet. USCIS's yearly updates (http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/Local%20Processing%20Times_FINAL_11Aug08.pdf) reveal more. As I said earlier, depending on where you live, your processing time can be anywhere between 5 and 15 months. From my visits to several naturalization-related threads, I have rarely seen anybody who became citizen under at least 1 year, going as far back as 2002. You are right, we won't expect another rush now as it was in year 2007 (compare the "Total" number naturalized in 2008 with that in 2007, Table 2, page 3, here (http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/natz_fr_2008.pdf)). But then, who knows what can happen after 5 years.

Kodi
04-30-2009, 03:16 PM
How can I get the clause removed from my SS card?

a1b2c3
04-30-2009, 03:26 PM
thanks a lot for the nice info. appreciate all the pointers. I know its all miles away but if it were not for some issues I am dealing with I would not have taken active interest in this.
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/natz_fr_2008.pdf amazes me.record #s from mexico? nearly 232k vs 62k from india in 2008.

eb2_immigrant
04-30-2009, 04:18 PM
With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am putting together a list of things to do, and not do, to maintain our freshly minted PR status, which should also help during future citizenship application. The list is mostly about little things that others have learned from experience (and I am learning from their experience, by reading in immigration-related forums such as IV). The more obvious things that can be found for example in USCIS handbook (http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-618.pdf) are not included here. Below is a snapshot of what I have gleaned from Internet so far, and please add your own input(s):

LIST of DO's :

1. Carry the original PR card on your person at all times (e.g. in your wallet), keep photocopies in different places, and also store A# on your computers. Note: This is a contentious issue (do a google on "carry green card" and see for yourself), despite being required by law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Some people are naturally worried about losing wallet and the eventual hassle of replacing the lost card (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=b3f7ab0a43b5d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=db029c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD), whereas others, including me, prefer to follow the law, in case I am suddenly asked to produce evidence of my legal status (e.g. in some border states, or unforeseen events, such as being involved in an out-of-state car accident where showing my DL might just not be enough). Failure to comply may result in, at best a fine, and at worst detention for breaking a law. (See comments by InTheMoment below for additional perspectives.)

2. Retain all original copies of USCIS documents related to your legal status during the entire period of stay in USA, and shred all photocopies (except when you have a photocopy but not its original).

3. Retain all employment-related documents, particularly original copies of appointment letters.

4. Retain copies of all tax return forms from the year of your first entry, or (at least) previous 10 years (you can request IRS (http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4506.pdf), or your professional tax preparer, for any missing copy).

5. Maintain a detailed log of USA exit/entry, including dates, POE and countries traveled, beginning with the day of first entry.

6. Maintain a detailed list of all legal troubles, including minor traffic infractions such as speeding violations (ignore parking violations, because they do not constitute legal "detention"), going as far back as possible. Keep copies of all relevant court papers, traffic tickets, proof of any payment (e.g. scanned copies of personal checks used, credit card statements), and so on.

7. Update your social security card (http://www.ssa.gov/online/ss-5.html) to remove any restrictive clause about work authorization printed on it. Note: AFAIK, the procedure changes nothing as far as your privileges go, and some of you may not even have such a clause on your SS card (I don't have it either).

8. Return your I-94 cards to POE on your next trip outside USA, to "close the open files" on your past travels (I do not know what it means though). Note: AFAIK, this is also not required, and besides, you should have the chance to do this while applying for citizenship.

9. Renew DL to get rid of the annoying "Temporary" word (in case you are in one of those states that do this).

10. Update your status with your employer by filing new I-9 form (thanks to InTheMoment for this point).

11. Continue to notify USCIS (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=c1a94154d7b3d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D) about change of address within 10 days of moving, as before (thanks to seahawks for this point).

12. Keep a list of current and past residential addresses, including dates of stay. Retain all leases/ownership documents.

13. Remember the basics: Initiate your GC/passport renewal process at least 6 months before expiry/Intl travel (Thanks to pappu for this point.)

14. And yes, move the family first commitment at the top of your must-do list, now that you have less worry about re-entry, and make that long-delayed trip home to see your old folks one more time. (I am visiting my 83-yr old Dad, who still has more hair than I do, and less gray too, in June.)

LIST of DONOT's :

1. Do not sign up for voter registration card. In particular, never vote in national/state/local elections that are open only to citizens, because this is also a law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Even an accidental mistake (e.g. voting out of ignorance) is a serious offense, which would not only derail your future citizenship plan, but may even result in deportation.

2. Do not develop a pattern of frequent and/or long absences from USA, unless you have taken prior permission for valid reasons (e.g., studying abroad, medical emergencies etc). Otherwise you may face trouble at POE on your next re-entry attempt, because DHS has become stricter in recent times about possible misuse of PR status, and POE folks are now trained to spot such patterns.

3. Do not switch job soon after getting GC. This is one of the most discussed, but least understood, issues because no one seems to agree on "how soon is soon". The rule of thumb appears to be "6 months", and a safer bet is "1 year" (here is a thread (http://forums.immigration.com/showthread.php?t=154533) on another forum). This again relates to USCIS being increasingly sensitive to possible misuse of PR status, and this question will come up during your citizenship application process. (But, as InTheMoment points out below, the issue becomes moot if you invoke AC21.)

4. Those of us who self-sponsored our GC via NIW or EB1A route are not bound by such employer-employee commitment, but you should continue working in "similar areas of expertise" that you claimed in your NIW/EB1A petition, and preferably on a longer time scale.

[This is an evolving list thanks to valuable inputs from folks here and elsewhere, so keep checking back.]

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck

Good post I like it and I probably may follow most of these eventually but, if I think about it, it seems to me lot of stress. Maintaining records from past ten (GC)/fifteen (Citizenship) years is certainly a stressful activity. Except education certificates I never cared for anything in my home country. In spite of taking care of all this, if you get involved in an unfortunate event everything GC/Citizenship goes into vain and back to one.

I am not trying to discourage or depress any one. It’s just a thought.

StuckInTheMuck
04-30-2009, 04:29 PM
How can I get the clause removed from my SS card?
You can apply for a replacement SS card with that clause removed (point #7 has the link for this procedure) only after you get the green card.

StuckInTheMuck
04-30-2009, 04:48 PM
Good post I like it and I probably may follow most of these eventually but, if I think about it, it seems to me lot of stress. Maintaining records from past ten (GC)/fifteen (Citizenship) years is certainly a stressful activity. Except education certificates I never cared for anything in my home country. In spite of taking care of all this, if you get involved in an unfortunate event everything GC/Citizenship goes into vain and back to one.
I am not trying to discourage or depress any one. It’s just a thought.
Appreciate your thought, thanks. Maintaining detailed documentation can be a big pain in you-know-where, particularly if I am asked to do it suddenly today (believe me, I am one of the world's leading disorganized blokes). Instead, if I begin to get organized early, the process eventually becomes incremental and stress-free. That is what I wanted to share here, the idea of getting organized early to have a smoother passage of time later (much like invest-today-afford-later philosophy). Unfortunate events are unpredictable, but that should not mean I ignore what I can control :)

Kodi
04-30-2009, 05:14 PM
Thanks. I already have the GC so I need to get my SS replaced.

hyddsnr
04-30-2009, 09:23 PM
Hi,

Its been two months passed since i got GC. My question is , Is it necessary to stay with employer for atleast six months after getting GC. Would really appreciate if someone helps me out.

a1b2c3
04-30-2009, 09:32 PM
Hi,

Its been two months passed since i got GC. My question is , Is it necessary to stay with employer for atleast six months after getting GC. Would really appreciate if someone helps me out.

Yes, I have the same question. Everything is a good practice recommendation. That is confusing.
And I thought it was one year. Is it 6 months?:confused:

hyddsnr
04-30-2009, 09:39 PM
Yes, I have the same question. Everything is a good practice recommendation. That is confusing.
And I thought it was one year. Is it 6 months?:confused:



Hi,

I heard it is six months. But someone should clarify whether its 6 or 1 yr. And also it is really necessary to work for 6 months/1 Yr or not??

InTheMoment
05-01-2009, 12:04 AM
Kodi,

Go here (http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showthread.php?t=20610), where I have given my experience and some more details on updating ones SS Card.



Thanks. I already have the GC so I need to get my SS replaced.

InTheMoment
05-01-2009, 12:13 AM
That's interesting...from my visits to various threads and from wait times of my friends (3 to precise) who recently got naturalized, the average time after receipt of N-400 to taking oath is around only 4 to 5 months.


Thanks. I have seen this document before, and if we are both looking at the same place (top of page 10), this is an average estimate that sweeps lot of detail under the carpet. USCIS's yearly updates (http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/Local%20Processing%20Times_FINAL_11Aug08.pdf) reveal more. As I said earlier, depending on where you live, your processing time can be anywhere between 5 and 15 months. From my visits to several naturalization-related threads, I have rarely seen anybody who became citizen under at least 1 year, going as far back as 2002. You are right, we won't expect another rush now as it was in year 2007 (compare the "Total" number naturalized in 2008 with that in 2007, Table 2, page 3, here (http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/natz_fr_2008.pdf)). But then, who knows what can happen after 5 years.

StuckInTheMuck
05-01-2009, 10:50 AM
I heard it is six months. But someone should clarify whether its 6 or 1 yr. And also it is really necessary to work for 6 months/1 Yr or not??
I doubt if any one can clarify this question more than what is already said so far. Neither DHS nor USCIS specified the minimum time one should stay with the (GC-sponsoring) employer after becoming PR. At the end it comes down to establishing your intention, that is, making sure your decision does not raise a red flag when USCIS pulls up your employment history later (during your citizenship interview, or if something else triggers a background check, e.g. your employer being investigated for a potential fraud). There are mitigating circumstances that should help if you leave early, such as being laid off soon after becoming PR, or as someone pointed out, if you invoked AC21 while waiting for GC etc. (These are things I admit I do not know much about, as my own GC was self-sponsored.) We are talking intangibles here, and you are unlikely to find any set-in-stone rule.

Having said that, your decision should not (read never) be dictated entirely by how USCIS may interpret your intention. There are other priorities, such as family, that should come first and foremost. After years of letting USCIS be the lord-and-master while we waited for GC, it is high time we step up and take control of our life. Besides, after looking up several threads over quite some time, I did not come across a single case of anyone being denied citizenship, or having GC revoked, on employment history alone. (The biggest deciding factor has almost always been "moral character".) Knowing the importance of this issue, if any of you have read (not heard from a friend of a friend of a friend of a...) a counter example where someone indeed faced problem because of employment, please post the link.

StuckInTheMuck
05-01-2009, 11:00 AM
That's interesting...from my visits to various threads and from wait times of my friends (3 to precise) who recently got naturalized, the average time after receipt of N-400 to taking oath is around only 4 to 5 months.
Good to know, thanks. Maybe we were reading different threads :) One thing though, because of the heavy rush of citizenship filing in 2007, combined with the election-year pressure of 2008, petitions were fast-tracked in recent years. There are so many confounding factors, anything is possible.

suavesandeep
05-01-2009, 12:30 PM
Good to know, thanks. Maybe we were reading different threads :) One thing though, because of the heavy rush of citizenship filing in 2007, combined with the election-year pressure of 2008, petitions were fast-tracked in recent years. There are so many confounding factors, anything is possible.
I can attest to this as well, I know couple of close friends one in NJ area and one in Bay Area CA both of whom got naturalized in 3-5 months time frame. This occurred in the last 2 months so this is fresh data. In both cases the N400 app was approved within 3 months of filing..And the interview was a month later after the approval. Again i just know these 2 guys so my data spread is limited. On other hand i dont know anybody in my circle waiting for a long time on N400.

dummgelauft
05-01-2009, 12:49 PM
Hi,

Its been two months passed since i got GC. My question is , Is it necessary to stay with employer for atleast six months after getting GC. Would really appreciate if someone helps me out.

No dude, its not 6 months, it more like 15 years...tough crap dude..you are now a bonded slave....:-(

StuckInTheMuck
05-01-2009, 04:10 PM
Kodi,

Go here (http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showthread.php?t=20610), where I have given my experience and some more details on updating ones SS Card.
Good stuff, added the link in my list. Thanks.

hyddsnr
05-01-2009, 04:10 PM
No dude, its not 6 months, it more like 15 years...tough crap dude..you are now a bonded slave....:-(


Hi,

Looks like you are used to work as a bonded slave, and expecting same from others. Be a free bird at least after getting GC.

chiraj
05-01-2009, 10:16 PM
I am have been on /off with my pay roll’s. I am still with my Green card sponsored company.
It’s almost 9 months since i got my GC. At the time of citizenship
How does USCIS verify the length of stay with the petition employer? Are they going to see the pay stubs or Length of the stay or a letter from employer….

plz help me.....

bhatt
05-01-2009, 10:59 PM
With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am putting together a list of things to do, and not do, to maintain our freshly minted PR status, which should also help during future citizenship application. The list is mostly about little things that others have learned from experience (and I am learning from their experience, by reading in immigration-related forums such as IV). The more obvious things that can be found for example in USCIS handbook (http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-618.pdf) are not included here. Below is a snapshot of what I have gleaned from Internet so far, and please add your own input(s):

[This is an evolving list thanks to valuable inputs from folks here and elsewhere, so keep checking back.]

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck
I didn't think of It. If we had stayed back in india, we don't have have to do any of these.:rolleyes::confused: . After GC also no freedom. As one of my american co-worker was telling, In America only the statue of liberty has the freedom.

StuckInTheMuck
05-03-2009, 01:17 AM
If we had stayed back in india, we don't have have to do any of these.:rolleyes::confused: . After GC also no freedom. As one of my american co-worker was telling, In America only the statue of liberty has the freedom.
The mistaken notion "GC = freedom" seems so pervasive that I am also tempted to take a whack at this much maligned equation. Lot of anguish can be spared by keeping our expectation from this 3" X 2" plastic somewhat grounded in reality. There is no denying that having GC makes life easier than before, specifically by opening up more job/career opportunities. But these have nothing to do with the constitutional freedom that you presumably allude to with your Statue of Liberty analogy (I should say though, as a metaphor this quote of your colleague is pretty lame). Not only GC does not give us the right to vote, it cannot even protect us from deportation risk on relatively minor legal grounds (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/12/us/12naturalize.html?_r=1). It is perhaps wise to remind ourselves that GC is a privilege (http://www.wr.org/media/pdf/immigrationassistance/permanentresident.pdf), not a right.

Here is the other thing I do not get. What is so hard to do in the list that raises such heckles of hair loss, back-in-good-ole-days-life-was-better, and whatnot? It is all about doing little day-to-day things such as maintaining documents (that you would do anyway), or carrying PR card in your (already bloated) wallet, and other mostly mundane stuff. I do not find this such a tortuous existence, despite being a lazy bum myself.

StuckInTheMuck
05-06-2009, 11:02 AM
I am have been on /off with my pay roll’s. I am still with my Green card sponsored company.
It’s almost 9 months since i got my GC. At the time of citizenship
How does USCIS verify the length of stay with the petition employer? Are they going to see the pay stubs or Length of the stay or a letter from employer….

plz help me.....
Sorry I missed your question before. My take on your situation is that you are good, and do not worry too much about USCIS's way of doing things. Did your company serve you any temporary suspension/reinstatement notice(s) coinciding with these payroll gaps? If not, and I would guess not (because that would reflect poorly on the company's health), your story means that as per your original employment letter, you have been with your employer continuously for 9 months after GC, and presumably longer (you did not say about any plan of leaving them soon), even though you are not being paid regularly. If anything, such payroll discontinuity should help establish your intention of remaining with your employer despite the hardship, if this issue comes up during citizenship interview. On your part, you should keep a detailed log of the dates you missed payments, in addition to all relevant papers (this goes back to DO item #3 in my list).

On your question about how USCIS verifies the length of stay with GC-sponsoring employer, my guess would be that for simple cases, they probably go by the employment letter or W2 etc. (something that has a single start date, and may/not have an end date). But if there are complicating factors, like your payroll gaps, and if USCIS comes to know about them (e.g. you tell them), they may ask your company to furnish evidence of payment history, such as copies of all relevant pay stubs (a simple letter from your employer may not suffice).

Chin up, please. You have your GC, which already makes you privileged compared to so many deserving folks still waiting long and hard. So, go hit the pub, shoot some pool, smell a rose, call up your fiance(e), take family on a Bahama cruise, tweak your boss's nose, kick some butt, write a(nother) check to IV, or whatever it is that you use as a release mechanism from such unnecessary tension :)

Cheers,
stuck

andycool
07-16-2010, 02:04 PM
With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am putting together a list of things to do, and not do, to maintain our freshly minted PR status, which should also help during future citizenship application. The list is mostly about little things that others have learned from experience (and I am learning from their experience, by reading in immigration-related forums such as IV). The more obvious things that can be found for example in USCIS handbook (http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-618.pdf) are not included here. Below is a snapshot of what I have gleaned from Internet so far, and please add your own input(s):

LIST of DO's :

1. Carry the original PR card on your person at all times (e.g. in your wallet), keep photocopies in different places, and also store A# on your computers. Note: This is a contentious issue (do a google on "carry green card" and see for yourself), despite being required by law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Some people are naturally worried about losing wallet and the eventual hassle of replacing the lost card (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=b3f7ab0a43b5d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=db029c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD), whereas others, including me, prefer to follow the law, in case I am suddenly asked to produce evidence of my legal status (e.g. in some border states, or unforeseen events, such as being involved in an out-of-state car accident where showing my DL might just not be enough). Failure to comply may result in, at best a fine, and at worst detention for breaking a law. (See comments by InTheMoment below for additional perspectives.)

2. Retain all original copies of USCIS documents related to your legal status during the entire period of stay in USA, and shred all photocopies (except when you have a photocopy but not its original).

3. Retain all employment-related documents, particularly original copies of appointment letters.

4. Retain copies of all tax return forms from the year of your first entry, or (at least) previous 10 years (you can request IRS (http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4506.pdf), or your professional tax preparer, for any missing copy).

5. Maintain a detailed log of USA exit/entry, including dates, POE and countries traveled, beginning with the day of first entry.

6. Maintain a detailed list of all legal troubles, including minor traffic infractions such as speeding violations (ignore parking violations, because they do not constitute legal "detention"), going as far back as possible. Keep copies of all relevant court papers, traffic tickets, proof of any payment (e.g. scanned copies of personal checks used, credit card statements), and so on.

7. Update your social security card (http://www.ssa.gov/online/ss-5.html) to remove any restrictive clause about work authorization printed on it. Here is another thread (http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showthread.php?t=20610) that discusses this point further. Note: AFAIK, the procedure changes nothing as far as your privileges go, and some of you may not even have such a clause on your SS card (I don't have it either).

8. Return your I-94 cards to POE on your next trip outside USA, to "close the open files" on your past travels. AFAIK, this may be more relevant to those who applied for GC via special registration (NSEER) (http://www.ice.gov/pi/specialregistration/), and probably does not matter to others.

9. Renew DL to get rid of the annoying "Temporary" word (in case you are in one of those states that do this).

10. Update your status with your employer by filing new I-9 form (thanks to InTheMoment for this point).

11. Continue to notify USCIS (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=c1a94154d7b3d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D) about change of address within 10 days of moving, as before (thanks to seahawks for this point).

12. Keep a list of current and past residential addresses, including dates of stay. Retain all leases/ownership documents.

13. Remember the basics: Initiate your GC/passport renewal process at least 6 months before expiry/Intl travel (Thanks to pappu for this point.)

14. And yes, move the family first commitment at the top of your must-do list, now that you have less worry about re-entry, and make that long-delayed trip home to see your old folks one more time. (I am visiting my 83-yr old Dad, who still has more hair than I do, and less gray too, in June.)

LIST of DONOT's :

1. Do not sign up for voter registration card. In particular, never vote in national/state/local elections that are open only to citizens, because this is also a law (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=fe17e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCR D&vgnextchannel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1 RCRD). Even an accidental mistake (e.g. voting out of ignorance) is a serious offense, which would not only derail your future citizenship plan, but may even result in deportation.

2. Do not develop a pattern of frequent and/or long absences from USA, unless you have taken prior permission for valid reasons (e.g., studying abroad, medical emergencies etc). Otherwise you may face trouble at POE on your next re-entry attempt, because DHS has become stricter in recent times about possible misuse of PR status, and POE folks are now trained to spot such patterns.

3. Do not switch job soon after getting GC. This is one of the most discussed, but least understood, issues because no one seems to agree on "how soon is soon". The rule of thumb appears to be "6 months", and a safer bet is "1 year" (here is a thread (http://forums.immigration.com/showthread.php?t=154533) on another forum). This again relates to USCIS being increasingly sensitive to possible misuse of PR status, and this question will come up during your citizenship application process. (Invoking AC21 while GC was pending makes the issue somewhat different (http://www.murthy.com/485faq.html#13).)

4. Those of us who self-sponsored our GC via NIW or EB1A route are not bound by such employer-employee commitment, but you should continue working in "similar areas of expertise" that you claimed in your NIW/EB1A petition, and preferably on a longer time scale.

[This is an evolving list thanks to valuable inputs from folks here and elsewhere, so keep checking back.]

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck

5. When you file taxes Never claim your self as Non Immigrant .

easygoer
07-16-2010, 03:06 PM
[QUOTE=InTheMoment;337297]Thanks for the compilation.


That said, with the AC21 portability, once an employee is working in the sponsor company for more than 180 days after I-485 filing (and possibly years before that) the issue of staying on with the sponsor for 6 months to 1 year is a completely moot point!

Good point 'InTheMoment'. I may receive my GC next month or within 2-3 months. If I leave my company (as I have a very good offer which I may lose if I do not accpet) within say 2 months, what problem this may cause at the time of Citizenship? Apart from six months rule, do we have a practical example of someone having trouble geting Citizenship if leave my sponsored empoyer immediately after getting Green Card.

transpass
08-18-2010, 01:41 PM
Under the list of DOs, once you have GC,

Shouldn't every male 18-26 yrs old with GC needs to register with Special Service (SSR)? isn't that the law? Can anyone shed light on this?

InTheMoment
08-18-2010, 01:55 PM
Excellent point. It is called the Selective Service System (www.sss.gov), used when the President orders a military draft (like the ones during WW2 and Vietnam war)

You have to register (males only) if you become a Permanent Resident in the ages 18-26; otherwise you could have problems during naturalization (N-400 has a specific question for Selective Service) and securing Federal Student Aid.

skg007
08-18-2010, 02:00 PM
What about people who did not file AC21. How do they prepare for Citizenship? Do they need to go back to the previous employer.:confused:

justAnotherFile
08-18-2010, 02:08 PM
I've live for 15 years in the states and never carried my Passport or Visa Papers when within the country even when out of state. I never got in trouble for that. I don't see the need why I should suddenly start carrying it now.

Of course if I am travelling close to the Mexican/Canadian borders I may carry as extra precaution but otherwise no.

feedfront
08-18-2010, 05:00 PM
But, when will my time come to apply?? :confused:

rockstart
08-20-2010, 10:45 AM
StuckInMuck thanks for the awesome compilation. I have a follow-up question to the guru's on forum.

I did an AC21 before my GC got approved. I did this on my EAD card and when I joined I filed my I9 form for taxes. Now after getting GC do I need to renew my I9 form or the old one stays valid?

Also since I am not with my GC sponsoring employer do I still need to follow the 6 months rule with my current employer since date of approval?

Also can we move this compilation to IV Wiki?

gbof
08-20-2010, 10:53 AM
Thanks All-
.. for this valuable information. Best wishes

vishwak
08-20-2010, 10:59 AM
Hi All,

I heard that after gettign GC and before Applying for Citizenship we should stay in US continously for 3.5 years how far is that true.
What is the exact rule? Can someone please guide me thru proper thread.

justAnotherFile
08-20-2010, 12:57 PM
StuckInMuck thanks for the awesome compilation. I have a follow-up question to the guru's on forum.

I did an AC21 before my GC got approved. I did this on my EAD card and when I joined I filed my I9 form for taxes. Now after getting GC do I need to renew my I9 form or the old one stays valid?

Also since I am not with my GC sponsoring employer do I still need to follow the 6 months rule with my current employer since date of approval?

Also can we move this compilation to IV Wiki?

#1 You need to update the I-9 form of verification because previously you employment authorization was the EAD card now your employment authorization is the GC card.

#2 First of all there is no 6 month rule. Secondly even if theoretically there is a undefined period it does not apply to you anymore since you are no longer with your GC filing employer.

go_guy123
08-20-2010, 05:39 PM
Excellent point. It is called the Selective Service System (Selective Service System: Welcome (http://www.sss.gov)), used when the President orders a military draft (like the ones during WW2 and Vietnam war)

You have to register (males only) if you become a Permanent Resident in the ages 18-26; otherwise you could have problems during naturalization (N-400 has a specific question for Selective Service) and securing Federal Student Aid.

Given the backlog and mess...i wonder how many will be 26 and below. Mainly applies to family based immigration.

transpass
08-20-2010, 05:43 PM
Given the backlog and mess...i wonder how many will be 26 and below. Mainly applies to family based immigration.

Not necessarily....EB GC recipients have kids who might have gotten derivative GCs through parents...

MeraNaamJoker
08-25-2010, 10:59 AM
With my very best wishes to those of you waiting for your GC, this thread is created for the lucky among us who received it recently. I am putting together a list of things to do, and not do, to maintain our freshly minted PR status, which should also help during future citizenship application. The list is mostly about little things that others have learned from experience (and I am learning from their experience, by reading in immigration-related forums such as IV). The more obvious things that can be found for example in USCIS handbook (http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M-618.pdf) are not included here. Below is a snapshot of what I have gleaned from Internet so far, and please add your own input(s):

LIST of DO's :

[This is an evolving list thanks to valuable inputs from folks here and elsewhere, so keep checking back.]

Cheers,
Stuck(no more)InTheMuck

Thanks for the detailed information.

I have a unique situation here. My original GC sponsor (a multi billion dollar industry leader) laid me off after 6 months of I485 due to lack of position in the company.

I ported my GC using AC 21 and joined another small consulting company. Now my GC is approved and I have an offer in hand from another company.

Will it be a good idea to move or do I have to wait for 6 months or 1 year before I make an employment switch.

My most important consideration is that there is chance of potential loss of job (may god forbid) with the current position. I may be able to save myself by switiching job right now. And of course there is more money on the table.

MeraNaamJoker
08-25-2010, 11:05 AM
Hi All,

I heard that after gettign GC and before Applying for Citizenship we should stay in US continously for 3.5 years how far is that true.
What is the exact rule? Can someone please guide me thru proper thread.

USCIS - A Guide to Naturalization (http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=4df39ddf801b3210VgnVCM100000b92ca60aRCR D&vgnextchannel=4df39ddf801b3210VgnVCM100000b92ca60a RCRD)

Read page 18

JS2225
08-25-2010, 12:41 PM
I am with the same employer who sponsored GC. Until GC was approved I was with H1B visa. Is it neccessary for me to file I-9 after GC?

boreal
08-25-2010, 01:02 PM
I am with the same employer who sponsored GC. Until GC was approved I was with H1B visa. Is it neccessary for me to file I-9 after GC?

Yes. They would need GC copy and they would update their records.

JS2225
09-02-2010, 06:16 PM
Thanks.

I have another question:

If the PERM was filed in a different state should the person move to that state after GC approval? This is under the assumption that the person continues to work for the sponsor company.

dummgelauft
09-03-2010, 10:20 AM
Yes. They would need GC copy and they would update their records.

Your employer is responsible for keeping a track of your status, not yours. You may provide them a copy of your new status, but you do not have to, unless they ask for it.

dummgelauft
09-03-2010, 10:24 AM
Thanks for the detailed information.

I have a unique situation here. My original GC sponsor (a multi billion dollar industry leader) laid me off after 6 months of I485 due to lack of position in the company.

I ported my GC using AC 21 and joined another small consulting company. Now my GC is approved and I have an offer in hand from another company.

Will it be a good idea to move or do I have to wait for 6 months or 1 year before I make an employment switch.

My most important consideration is that there is chance of potential loss of job (may god forbid) with the current position. I may be able to save myself by switiching job right now. And of course there is more money on the table.

You are not with your sponsoring employer anyways, so take the new offer if you want. A piece of advice though, for such critical decisions, it is best to spend some money and consult an attorney, rather than muck about on IV and such. An hours consultation ( which all you should need), will cost you u2 may be 3 hundred dollars, but you will get proper advice.

permfiling
10-23-2010, 12:45 AM
There is a weekly conf call with attorney Prashanthi on thursday 9 pm EST. In one of the calls I had this question and the answer is that once you use AC21, the most recent company were you are working and where your GC got approved will be your sponsor so u have to stay with that company for 6 months ( the time duration is debated in other threads)

hoolahoous
10-23-2010, 01:45 PM
you can document (some emails/documents indicating that job loss was possible) that you had to move because of things out of your control, i.e. you had intentions of working but because of situation you had to move, then you will be fine.

same things apply if you are laid off soon after getting GC.
i learned not to make career decisions based on "potential" future problems.




-------------------------------------
i am not a lawyer and don't consider my advice as legal advice.

gcmangtai
07-21-2011, 04:42 PM
5. Maintain a detailed log of USA exit/entry, including dates, POE and countries traveled, beginning with the day of first entry.

First BIG thanks for putting this detailed list of DOs and DONTs.
Question related to # 5. Passports have stamps of when a county is entered US or visiting/home country. I guess my question is, is there any reason/advantage maintaining a seperate log except it would be handy?

InTheMoment
07-22-2011, 12:42 AM
If you decide to naturalize and fill out the N-400, this log will make your life much easier!

You won't have to decipher the haphazardly located and possibly unreadable stamps in one or multiple passports.

Secondly, if you visit Canada and return, there is no stamp in the PP as the PP is not required for Canadian visits from the US (I have made several and do not have a single stamp in the PP - never needed to present it)


First BIG thanks for putting this detailed list of DOs and DONTs.
Question related to # 5. Passports have stamps of when a county is entered US or visiting/home country. I guess my question is, is there any reason/advantage maintaining a seperate log except it would be handy?

gcmangtai
07-22-2011, 08:33 AM
If you decide to naturalize and fill out the N-400, this log will make your life much easier!

You won't have to decipher the haphazardly located and possibly unreadable stamps in one or multiple passports.

Secondly, if you visit Canada and return, there is no stamp in the PP as the PP is not required for Canadian visits from the US (I have made several and do not have a single stamp in the PP - never needed to present it)
Canada thing certainly makes sense... Thanks InTheMoment!

StuckInTheMuck
07-22-2011, 12:19 PM
Secondly, if you visit Canada and return, there is no stamp in the PP as the PP is not required for Canadian visits from the US (I have made several and do not have a single stamp in the PP - never needed to present it)
great point indeed !

tabletpc
07-22-2011, 12:27 PM
Just curious ..

Like in H1B , do we need to be working all the time ..??? In h1B there is time gap of 10 days to look for another job…does this exist with GC to ..???

Is there is limit in how many hours/week we can work when we do multiple jobs ?

nlssubbu
07-22-2011, 03:35 PM
Just curious ..

Like in H1B , do we need to be working all the time ..??? In h1B there is time gap of 10 days to look for another job…does this exist with GC to ..???

Is there is limit in how many hours/week we can work when we do multiple jobs ?

Nope. No requirement that you need to be working all the time. In fact, if you are laid off, you can collect unemployement also from Govt :)

There is no limit in hours. You can work multiple jobs and in any job that is no longer relevant to your labor based on GC.

You are free from all restrictions, except for to be in USA at least for 6 months or more to maintain continuous residency.

Thanks

jindhal
07-24-2011, 09:02 AM
For #6 : About keeping all documentation of arrests and citations. The following rule applies.

if you have been arrested or convicted of a crime, you must send a certified copy of the arrest report, court disposition, sentencing and any other relevant documents, including any countervailing evidence concerning the circumstances of your arrest or conviction that you would like USCIS to consider. Note that unless a traffic incident was alcohol or drug related, you do not need to submit documentation for traffic fines and incidents that did not involve an actual arrest if the only penalty was a fine of less than $500 or points on your driver's license.