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andreafejes26
03-31-2010, 09:42 PM
I have been working in the USA with an H1B Visa since Nov, 2007; this until August 2009 when I was laid off by my employer/sponsor (Company A). Last time I entered the US was August 13, 2009 (I was admitted until Sep 23, 2010 day the H1B visa expires). Last pay stub August 2009.

I dedicated myself to get a new job (I didn't know at the time that my staying represented a huge risk for me). I finally got a job offer on November 15, 2009. It is an international group who just opened an office in Miami.

Holidays, all the foreign management start up procedures, along with the fact that the lawyer was very slow, made that the actual application date for I-129 March 1st.2010. Imagine that. We required premium processing.

On January 15, I asked my lawyer if considering the delay of the new employer (it is a new business here in the US), and all other issues, it was better for me just to leave the country and simple apply again on April 2010. He said no.

On March 1, 2010 (effective date of the application) I started to formally work for company B -I just got my first pay stub. On March 22, 2009, USCIS sent a request for further evidence. The lawyer has the letter -I enclosed- in his desk since last Thursday. Response is due May 6, 2010.

As you can see USCIS requires, among other matters, pay stubs from January 1 2010 to present (from Company A). For 2009 we filed my W2 and 2009 income tax return. They didn't ask for 2009.

What should I do? Should I say that I don't have the pay stubs (implicit recognition I didn't maintain status), explaining that I indeed got an offer, and all the reasons for the delay?, or try to ask my ex employer if they give me a letter indicating I'm still her employee (I doubt they will do that, but I can try).

What are my options/risks; deportation for instance? Should I leave the country immediately?

roseball
04-01-2010, 12:01 AM
I have been working in the USA with an H1B Visa since Nov, 2007; this until August 2009 when I was laid off by my employer/sponsor (Company A). Last time I entered the US was August 13, 2009 (I was admitted until Sep 23, 2010 day the H1B visa expires). Last pay stub August 2009.

I dedicated myself to get a new job (I didn't know at the time that my staying represented a huge risk for me). I finally got a job offer on November 15, 2009. It is an international group who just opened an office in Miami.

Holidays, all the foreign management start up procedures, along with the fact that the lawyer was very slow, made that the actual application date for I-129 March 1st.2010. Imagine that. We required premium processing.

On January 15, I asked my lawyer if considering the delay of the new employer (it is a new business here in the US), and all other issues, it was better for me just to leave the country and simple apply again on April 2010. He said no.

On March 1, 2010 (effective date of the application) I started to formally work for company B -I just got my first pay stub. On March 22, 2009, USCIS sent a request for further evidence. The lawyer has the letter -I enclosed- in his desk since last Thursday. Response is due May 6, 2010.

As you can see USCIS requires, among other matters, pay stubs from January 1 2010 to present (from Company A). For 2009 we filed my W2 and 2009 income tax return. They didn't ask for 2009.

What should I do? Should I say that I don't have the pay stubs (implicit recognition I didn't maintain status), explaining that I indeed got an offer, and all the reasons for the delay?, or try to ask my ex employer if they give me a letter indicating I'm still her employee (I doubt they will do that, but I can try).

What are my options/risks; deportation for instance? Should I leave the country immediately?

You are in some serious trouble here.....You have been out-of-status since the time you were laid-off by company A. Though they didn't ask you for your pay stubs for the period of Sep'09 to Dec'09, it doesn't mean the illegal stay is pardoned. Not trying to scare you but you could be potentially banned for overstaying beyond 180 days....Moreover, you shouldn't have started working for company B since you were not maintaining a valid H1 status when your current H1 was filed. Your lawyer should have known better and given you advise based on your situation. Now don't make it worse by providing fraudulent letters claiming employment proof from your ex-employer. You might still have a slim chance to defend your case based on the fact that you had a job offer in hand, and the employer wanted to file your H1 but they couldn't do so earlier because of start-up procedures. I don't think that reason will excuse you from overstaying or not filing on time, but if the IO is generous, you might have a chance to get your H1 approved without an attached I-94, in which case you will have to go out of the country with the approval notice and get a H1 visa stamp and re-enter to be able to start working and gain back your H1 status. In the meantime, do consult with a reputed attorney and get advise on what would be the next steps.....Good luck.

andreafejes26
04-01-2010, 12:17 AM
Thanks a lot for your comments. They are really helpful.

In case I do what you mention, what normally comes with a rejection? would the USCIS go further (beyond the simple denial), and rule that I was out status penalizing/prohibiting me to enter the country?

Should it be better if I just leave the country and wait for the approval outside the US? I guess Im prepared for a denial, what concerns me the most is jeopardizing B1-B2 Visa or as you said to be prohibited to enter the country.

Do you know the "standard" wording for USCIS decision in cases like mine?

Thanks a lot again, I really appreciate your comments.

pointlesswait
04-01-2010, 12:30 AM
Dude,

I think one of the reasons why you got and RFE is because u filed for a transfer without sufficient paystubs. You need atleast 3-4 (bi weekly) paystubs to not raise any eyebrows.
So basically the IO officer was doing his thing and requesting all the basic documentation.

best scenarios would have been : If you had gone back to company A after a gap of few months, and filed for an extension and then transferred to Company B, this RFE would not have risen at all ...as you would have have continuous employment and pay stubs to show.

In this economy everyone has got hit pretty hard..so just hope for the best.



Thanks a lot for your comments. They are really helpful.

In case I do what you mention, what normally comes with a rejection? would the USCIS go further (beyond the simple denial), and rule that I was out status penalizing/prohibiting me to enter the country?

Should it be better if I just leave the country and wait for the approval outside the US? I guess Im prepared for a denial, what concerns me the most is jeopardizing B1-B2 Visa or as you said to be prohibited to enter the country.

Do you know the "standard" wording for USCIS decision in cases like mine?

Thanks a lot again, I really appreciate your comments.